Oral sex w/ fingering

Originally Posted: 
Monday, July 30, 2012
Tagged With: 
Question: 

I gave unprotected oral sex to a female while also fingering her with a small cut on my finger.  I am super worried I have contracted HIV, I am basically so worried I dont sleep and am completely stressed out.  

 
I had PCR (I think it was called that) at 3 weeks and at 8 weeks, both neg.  I know I need another at 3 months, which is in about 2 weeks.  
 
Can I relax yet?  The stress is seriously causing me to get sick, then of course I think that HIV is causing the sickness, and it's just a big circle of stress.  
 
Thanks in advance.
Answer: 

Hi there and thank you for choosing AIDS Vancouver as your source for HIV/AIDS related info.

It may be helpful for you to know that the activities you have engaged in do not put you at high risk of acquiring HIV.  Giving unprotected oral sex is low risk for HIV transmission, meaning that there have only been a few reports of infection attributed to this activity, but usually under other extenuating circumstances (i.e., in conjuction with a more high risk activity or giving to someone who very recently acquired HIV and has a very high viral load).  Fingering is negligible risk - the activity presents a potential for HIV transmission but there have been no documented reports of infection attributed to fingering.  Regarding the cut on your finger, HIV cannot enter your blood stream if the cut is small and scabbed over, as this presents a barrier to HIV transmission.  So, unless the cut on your finger was deep and actively bleeding, your risk assessment would not change.

The PCR DNA/RNA tests are virtually 100% accurate just a couple weeks after a possible exposure.  Therefore, your negative tests at 3 and 8 weeks are a very excellent indication of your HIV status.  Further HIV testing would most likely yield the same test results.  If you would like to comply with current HIV testing guidelines, you may wish to take one last follow-up test at 3 months, which would be conclusive and definitive.  Although, your results are unlikely to change and we have never seen a case of someone testing negative with PCR after 3 weeks and then suddenly testing positive at 3 months. 

It sounds like the testing process is causing you quite a bit of stress.  Many people find HIV testing a stressful process so you are not alone.  If you have any close friends, family, or health care professionals you could talk to, it may help alleviate some stress.  Otherwise, you can contact us by phone, email, or forum for support.            

For more information on HIV symptoms, click here.

I hope you have found this information useful.  Please let us know if you have any further questions or concerns. 

In Health,

Alexandra

AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer

E-mail: helpline@aidsvancouver.org

Phone (Mon-Fri 9am-4pm): (604) 696-4666

Web: www.aidsvancouver.org/helpline

Comments

Submitted by reza (not verified) on

i have sex with condom in uae maby i have hiv ? :( pls help me

helpline2's picture
Submitted by helpline2 on

Hi Reza,

You are to be congratulated for practicing safer sex by using a condom.  Having vaginal/anal sex with a condom is considered low risk, meaning  there is a potential for HIV exposure if the condom is not used properly, if there is breakage or tearing or if the condom has passed its expiry date.

The only way to know your HIV status for sure is to be tested.  We strongly encourage all sexually active individuals be tested for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI's), including HIV, on a regular basis.  Depending on the individual, this may be done annually, bi-annually or every 3-4 months.

In Health,
Jon,
AIDS Vancouver Helpline Volunteer
Phone:  604.696.4666

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